FOOT QUICKNESS AGILITY DRILL ESSENTIALS

Foot Quickness Agility Drills There are important differences that athletes, parents, and coaches must understand and demonstrate, as it relates to foot quickness and athletic speed.  Speed on a track is one thing.  However, speed on an athletic field or court is another.  Foot quickness is an essential requirement and is different from start speed, acceleration, or top speed.  Foot quickness refers to how quickly one begins movement, or how quickly one changes one set of motion and moves into another stream of motion.  Foot quickness is similar to how quickly a sprinter jumps out of the starting blocks, except we are referring to athletic movement, which is rarely straight ahead.   Once foot quickness has been initiated, start speed, acceleration and top speed ensue.

Agility rings, either as a substitute or as compliments to jumping rope and plyometrics, are excellent tools to develop and sharpen foot quickness.   More flexible than agility ladders, agility rings empower athletes to structure unique foot quickness agility drills.   Such drills should be performed in timed sets of five or six, and incorporated into an overall agility and speed training plan, executed two or three times per week.  If properly developed, foot quickness will allow athletes to augment agility and speed, by allowing them to enter the acceleration phase quicker, thus reaching top speed faster and with greater duration.

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AGILITY HURDLES – TOOLS OF CHOICE

Agility HurdlesThe saying “So many choices, so little time” is an appropriate phrase for agility tools.  There are literally too many specialty tools on the market to try them all in a single lifetime, let alone have the time to adequately test those tools and record what works for your particular physical needs.  In fact, that is one of the core reasons why SpeedTrainingReview.com exists, to take the veil off of those mysteries.  The agility hurdle is one of the few tools that I can truly recommend to athletes of any age that are affordable, portable and safe.

Not to be confused with a track and field hurdle, agility hurdles are smaller less obtrusive obstacles that athletes can use to either hurdle forward and backward, but also side to side.  They are ideal for younger athletes (ages 7 and up), but also ideal for Division I athletes and beyond.   The best part of agility hurdles is that they are portable, and athletes can structure their own agility drills, wherever they have space.  Through these tools, athletes develop leg muscles, foot speed, and athletic fitness,  all three important requirements for athletic success.

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PEAKING WITH AGILITY SPEED TRAINING

agility speed trainingI am often asked the following questions.

-What are the best workouts to get athletes to peak?

-How long can you hold a peak?

-What are you favorite peaking workouts for X event group or even a sport for that matter?

All fair questions. But if you’re asking them, you’re missing the mark.    It is important to understand that there are no magic “peaking” workouts.  If you’re looking for the perfect workout that’s going to pluck a huge PR out of the legs of your athletes, you’ve already lost.

Large drops in time (or gains in height/distance) stem directly from the workout and skill, the work you put into your agility speed training program. If you have a 12 week season, it’s what you do in the first 8 (or so) weeks that set the flight path for your peak. If you didn’t specifically design your progressions in a way that facilitates optimal execution during Championship Season, it doesn’t matter which elite coaches you steal ‘peaking’ workouts from. It won’t matter.

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FOOT QUICKNESS AGILITY DRILL RECOVERY STRATEGIES

Foot Quickness Agility DrillsTo me, speed training discussions should always involve a discussion of diet.  Without a good diet, athletes suffer the very real and very adverse effects that can occur without proper muscle recovery strategies.  We will discuss the first of the two critical requirements for muscle recovery.

Incorporating rest days in between foot quickness agility drills workouts is simply a critical component to any agility exercise program.  We also use lots of online training to keep our athletes engaged and learning and theory. One of the tools we incorporate is a learning management system to keep our courses created and deseminated. Unfortunately, many athletes ignore this truth, even though most athletes already know of the importance of rest.  For  example,  I mandate two rest days between exercise days for the athletes that I coach.  Rest days are important because the body recovers during those periods.  Building recovery into your workout week allows the body to adapt to the stress related from the workout, allows the body to replenish energy stores and repair damaged tissue breakdown.  For this reason, I strongly incorporate speed training programs that incorporate two days of recovery between training routines

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SPEED AND AGILITY OPINIONS WANTED

Speed And AgilityAs the founder of SpeedTraining Review, I wanted to thank everyone for visiting the site, and those that have contributed thus far.  Everyone that signs up as a subscriber is granted permission to write an article within one or two days.  We welcome everyone that has input to share, whether you are parents, an athlete, coach, or simply thinking about competing.

Most of our discussions center around speed for track and field, including sprint and long jump, or football, basketball,  or soccer.  However, there are additional sports that we don’t cover because we don’t have the expertise.  And, we would love to hear how those parents, athletes, and coaches train for other sports (like Lacrosse for example), especially the speed and agility training, speed and agility drills, or speed and agility equipment that you employ.  To contribute, please take five seconds to register, so that we may make you a contributor.  We would love to hear from anyone that has something to say.

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AGILITY TUNNELS, A QB’S TOOLS OF CHOICE

Agility TunnelsFootball coaches play many roles.  However, one of mine is that of the QB coach.  There is way way too much to learn to become a good quarterback.  And, I can’t teach it all.  I can, however, teach foot coordination, which is absolutely paramount to quarterback success.  My tools of choice for foot coordination are agility tunnels.

Agility tunnels are simple to set up, as all you need are four or five long foam football obstacle pads lined parallel to each other about ¾ of a yard apart.  My favorite drill has a quarterback come from snap, perform the five step drop through the tunnel formed by the obstacle pads, while simultaneously looking solely downfield.   Upon exiting the rear of  the agility tunnel (about five steps), the quarterback moves to the next tunnel, moving forward as if stepping into the pocket, finishing with a throw.  Then, this drill is repeated.  Through agility tunnels, quarterbacks not only develop foot coordination, but also get in the important habit of stepping into the pocket to make throws.

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REAL AGILITY COURSE TRAINING

Agility Course TrainingI don’t write too many articles here at STR.  Writin just aint really my thing.  Lots of talk about agility, but in Texas we call it giddyup.  Most times, I get distrustful of promises that will make you faster, better or slimmer.  Matter of fact, my waist is a perfect example that most of those slimmer things plum don’t work anyways.

However, for out football team, we did institute few additional “agility” drills this past football season, mostly because most of my players aint no bigger than a bar of soap on a hard days washin.  I’ll tell you what, most of our players got along like they had someplace to go.  We made playoffs with a 5-2 record, damn near won the whole thang.  All this is to say that there is more truth than fiction to agility course training.

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THE POWER MIX: AGILITY & RESISTANCE TRAINING

agility drillsThough I’m a football coach, I didn’t coach any of my kids.  I wanted to keep a good relationship with him and my other children.  That was a tough decision, because my oldest son is a terrific athlete, and his passion is football.  I do train him in the spring months for the upcoming football season, however.

Two years ago I began training him with agility exercises.  His first year, he produced six touchdowns in six games.  The following year, we put him on a local track team and were introduced to resistance training, both prior to the football season.  Then the football season began, and over only six and a half games, he produced sixteen touchdowns in six and a half games—believe me when I tell you he could have scored more.   That was all the proof I needed that agility training and resistance training work.

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FOOTBALL AGILITY DRILL EMPOWERMENT

football agility drillThey say that defense win championships.  However, I can tell you that team speed, at the very least, wins games.  And most times, it plays a big part in championships too.  If you’ve got a shut down defense, as fast as the other team’s offense, then you’re going to win, all things being equal (including coaching).

Having the fastest players on the field does not mean that I have the same players on the field at all times, however.  My fastest player, when tired, isn’t faster than my fourth fastest player, if my fourth fastest player is fresh.    During practice, I time and log football agility drills for each player.  By doing so, I understand the fatigue factor of each player, and ensure that the player on the field is relatively the fastest position player available for that particular time.

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SOCCER SPEED AGILITY DRILLS ACCELERATE YOUR GAME

Soccer Speed Agility DrillsAs many of you know, I’m a football coach.  Several years ago, however, I had to coach my son’s soccer team because the usual coach moved away.  I didn’t really know how to approach training.  However, I did quite a bit of reading, and reading, and reading.  Finally, I developed a plan using a project management software tool I found online.

I researched several soccer playing strategies and the training methods to prepare adequately for those strategies.  The team earned more wins than losses.  However, I took those soccer speed agility drills and incorporated them the next football season conditioning and quickness drill.  We won our first four games of the season that year, finishing at 7-2.  The team was faster, quicker and had more stamina than in past years. I’ve used those drills each year for the past seven years, and haven’t had a losing season since.